Zelda Lockhart–Fifth Born II

Fifth Born II

Zelda Lockhart has written a second book in the Fifth Born series, titled Fifth Born II.   I have pre-ordered a copy and am looking forward to reading it.  Fifth Born, her first in the series, can be ordered directly from Zelda Lockhart’s website.

Click here to read a summary of Fifth Born.  Also if you would like to pre-order a copy of Fifth Born II, contact Zelda Lockhart on her website, and she will gladly get it out to you.

Sports Artwork–Brilliant, Vibrant Watercolors

Sports Artwork in brilliant, vibrant watercolors.  Football, basketball, pool, golf, baseball–I enjoy them.

 

The Nicest Rejection Letter–Have You Received One?

I received the nicest rejection letter from the editor of a literary magazine, Umbrella Factory Magazine, informing me that my fiction piece would not be accepted for publication.  I must say receiving this kind of rejection letter was a welcomed treat because the editor commented on how well he liked the piece and offered suggestions for other literary magazines he thought I should submit the piece to.  Now, how many editors would do that?  I didn’t feel the sting of rejection from this letter because the editor did not indicate the piece was not good; he noted only that it would not find a home at his magazine. 

Hello Katrina,

Thank you for the submission.  Unfortunately, “The House Down the Dirt Lane” will not find a home with Umbrella Factory Magazine.  Your piece was a treat to read.   You clearly have a handle on the Southern dialect, and the dialogue is masterfully written.  I would think in the climate of our country today, a short piece about a shell-shocked vet will resonate with many readers.  Have you seen Clapboard House?  It’s been a few years since I’ve seen it, but it was one of my favorite magazines.   They focus on Southern literature.  Also, I use www.newpages.com as a resource; perhaps that will be a useful tool for you. 

Thank you.

[A nice person at Umbrella Factory]

Many writers who submit to literary magazines may not receive a rejection letter, or if they do, it may not state why the work was rejected, leaving the writer to wonder what was wrong with the piece.  In a case like that, my suggestion to writers would be to send the piece out again to another magazine.   What may not appeal to one editor may tickle another editor’s fancy.   

“Keep writing and publishing your work!”  That is the message I got from this nice rejection letter.  I know editors are very busy, but this type of rejection email, a nice one, will go a long way to encouraging writers to resubmit their works for publication after receiving a negative rejection letter.

If you have been fortunate to receive a nice rejection letter after submitting your work for publication, share your letter or experience with us.